Monthly Archives: August 2016

Biocommunication Sign-Mediated Interactions between Cells and Organisms

Gordon&Seckbach2016 Biocommunication Table of Contents

Dick’s latest book published by World Scientific as coeditor with Joseph Seckbach is now off to the printers. It includes a chapter on the Cybernetic Embryo which is an expansion of the idea in the final chapter of our book Embryogenesis Explained. The book will be out about December 2016.

Table of Contents:

Part I Theoretical Approaches

1. Molecular Biocommunication by Alexei A. Sharov

2. Key Levels of Biocommunication by Guenther Witzany

3. Zoosemiotics, Typologies of Signs and Continuity Between Humans and Other Animals by Dario Martinelli

4. Communication as an Artificial Process by Massimo Negrotti

 

5. Cybernetic Embryo by Richard Gordon and Robert Stone

6. Superfast Evolution via Trans and Interspecies Biocommunication by Ille C. Gebeshuber and Mark O. Macqueen

7. Channel Capacity and Rate Distortion in Amino Acid Networks by Boaz Tamir and Avner Priel

8. Communication Languages and Agents in Biological Systems by Subhash Kak

Part II Experimental Approaches

 

9. Chemical Communication by Ally R. Harari and R. Sharon

10. Paenibacillus vortex — A Bacterial Guide to the Wisdom of the Crowd by Alin Finkelshtein, Alexandra Sirota-Madi, Dalit Roth, Colin J. Ingham, and Eshel Ben Jacob

11. The Crosstalk Between Plants and Their Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbionts: A Mycocentric View by Cristiana Sbrana, Alessandra Turrini, and Manuela Giovannetti

12. Attraction of Preferred Prey by Carnivorous Plants by Douglas W. Darnowski

13. Animal Communication: Competition for Acoustic Space in Birds and Fish by Hans Slabbekoorn

14. The Contribution of Biocommunication (BICO) to Biomedical and Tissue Engineering: A Tech Mining Study by Angela Machado Rocha, Fernando Palop, Maria Clara Melro, and Marcelo Santana Silva

15. Communication Languages and Agents in Biological Systems by Noga Gershoni-Emek, Eitan Erez Zahavi, Shani Gluska, Yulia Slobodskoy, and Eran Perlson

16. Ethical Methods of Investigation with Pan/Homo Bonobos and Chimpanzees by E. Sue Rumbaugh, Itai Roffman, Elizabeth Pugh, and Duane M. Rumbaugh

17. Conversing with Dolphins: The Holy Grail of Interspecies Communication? by Toni Frohoff and Elizabeth Oriel

It’s done! Galley Proofs are off to the publisher.

At about 5:00am this morning Dick finished up the final touches and the book is now back with the publisher. This final round of proofing went very quickly. We found a few typos but there were no substantial changes. Three figures have to be reformatted because their size was changed in this round so they got either all stretched out of squashed short. The thing that took so long was the index.

Indexes are pretty much a thing of the past given electronic books, but this book is going out first in hard cover and so it needed a proper index. The publisher prepared a simple one but we weren’t satisfied. We ended up buying an indexing program for PDFs called PDF Index Generator. It worked quite well so I can recommend it. We were able to set the program to find every unique word, combine plurals and skip pages that were reference pages. We still ended up with a very long list of words of unique words. (42 pages in a word document) We then spent two days each combing put this list. We had to remove the words like “if”, “and”, “but”, “for”. We also found some words like “blastoceole/blastocele” with two, both correct, spelling versions to deal with.  We had to pick one and stick to it consistently. The indexing program is also unable to do phrases like “Robertsonian translocation”. So we had to go through our key phrase list and add those manually. For some words, like “gene” there were so many entries we simply removed the word and created a half a dozen key phrases which included the word gene.

There was a surprising  bonus to taking the time to do this indexing step, frustrating as it was. We ended up confronted with about a dozen more typos to fix.  For example, one of the words that turned up in the list was “microfilamet”. That should have been “microfilament”, of course, but somehow in all our readings and even with many spell checks, we missed that one. It is now fixed. This last four days of effort getting the index right was worth it, even if just for finding typos.

It has been a long long journey getting to this point with the book. The next step should be a hardcover book in our hands in a few months. The kindle version will follow. The reality of finally being done with this book is hitting me in waves and I suppose will continue to do so for the next few days.

Of course we have a few other projects going. We can now turn to some of the other work we have going, like “origin of life” and “diatom morphogenesis”. I have a published short story in science fiction I have halfway expanded into a full novel. Now I can finally start working on that.

And after some reluctance I gave in to the Amazon prodding and I now have my own Author Central page. Dick has had his for a long time.

Galley Proofs

If you have published a book you know there is one last peek before it goes out generally known as galley proofs. This is a set of proofs that are in the final form where you get one last chance to cross an ‘i’ or dot a ‘t’ and make sure all the previous corrections from the proofs have been added correctly. You can’t make any major changes, even one as small as adding a sentence or moving a paragraph without causing a major problem for the publisher and adding weeks to months before the book is published. Today those galley proofs arrived for us to look at. One last chance to make sure it is all perfect and then you have to let it go and let it stand as it is.

So exciting!